Obesity: Part 2

So, I went to a top London Hospital yesterday morning, booked in and at 10am, had my gastric band operation. The procedure went well, although finding a vein that would behave itself was rather difficult.  I spent the day in and out of consciousness, fighting the effects of the anesthetic, whilst fighting with my brain to shut up…it’s rather hard to know what it’s saying when a mask is helping to regulate the oxygen levels in your blood and your body has resigned itself to the sleepy bliss of the anesthesia.

I’m on a liquid only diet now for 2 weeks whilst the band and my stomach settles down to their new partnership. Tomato soup for breakfast is rather strange, but if it does what I need it to do, I’m all for waking up to soup every day!

I’m still very sore from the single incision, but after braving public transport and coming home today, I’m feeling rather positive about the days ahead and of what is expected of me.  My mind still thinks KFC would be heavenly, but thankfully, my brain is in charge here and is glad for the fluids that make sure my pain meds get into my system without a hitch.

I have to wear some rather unfashionable socks too to reduce the risk of Deep Vein Thrombosis…I’m looking at them right now and know what they scream – “Get off the PC before your feet swell so badly that we’ll have to cut off your blood supply!!” – that is my cue to go…although fat, I rather love these feet.

Obesity: Part 1

I shall be having Bariatric surgery this weekend in the form of a gastric band…this is the start of my journey of survival and one I wish to share here for all others who are overweight and considering their options.

In 2008-2010 I had heart problems and over time, due to inactivity as a result of those problems, I gained weight that exacerbated other conditions, including the slanted spine that I was born with.  I became depressed and ashamed of the way I looked and decided to do something about it.  So I tried new diets, including Xenical Reductil tablets that I bought on the internet for £100 per month’s supply.  When those didn’t work, I went to see my GP.

My GP told me that prior to a referral for a gastric band, I was expected to fill a certain criteria, so firstly I was sent to see a Health Adviser who discussed healthy eating with me.  During those 10 sessions, I learned everything I already knew – I wasn’t fat because of a bad diet, but because of inactivity.  As part of her job, she had to give feedback to my GP, stating that I had engaged in all of the sessions and had made progress in my quest to be healthier.

Upon returning to my GP, I found he had left and another doctor had taken his place.  The new doctor insisted he’d made the referral for a gastric band for me but insisted I again fill a certain criteria and referred me to see a nutritionist.  After several phone calls and missed appointments due to miscommunication, the nutritionist told me they were unable to help me because I was not able to engage in 1 hour’s strenuous exercise after each consultation with them.  So I again returned to my GP.

By this point I was very depressed with the situation and things got worse when my doctor advised me to eat less.  It had been assumed that I was overweight because I ate too much and I’d been conveniently stereotyped as “just another greedy fat person costing the NHS £1000’s”.  My GP made some excuse about the hospital’s computer system being updated and my gastric band referral not reaching them as a result.  He also suggested I be tested for Diabetes Type II, that “fat person’s disease”.  Suffice to say, I stopped visiting my GP.

When I related my experiences to a friend of mine, they kindly told me to research the private healthcare sector and get some quotes and offered to pay for the procedure as a gift to me and a healthier future.  This I did, chose the one I believe to be the best in the UK, and we booked a consultation.

I am currently 122.4kg in weight with a BMI of 36.6…apparently, on the NHS, you have to have a BMI of 50 before you can even be considered for bariatric surgery, regardless of any medical condition you might have.  I believe this to be unfair, same as I believe it unfair to stereotype every overweight person…we aren’t all greedy and lazy…some of us have real reasons why we have ended up in the position we are in.  When one is in severe physical pain every time they exercise, it becomes a catch-22 situation. No exercise means no weight loss regardless of whatever diet one chooses to partake in.

I’d be interested to hear your views on this topic and share in your experiences and suggestions.  I pay my taxes and thus, have a right to my voice…even if the powers that be disagree.